Archive for category lambdas

Refactoring large conditional method using method references

Some years ago I wrote junit-parameters, which is basically a custom JUnit test runner that make it possible to add parameters to JUnit 4 test methods.

Browsing its source code SonarLint pointed me a large conditional if/else method from the ParameterTypeConverterFactory class:

This method converts the method parameter to its specific type based on its Class object. As it is few lines long, it showed me a good opportunity to refactor this code a little bit with a more elegant solution. This project has unit tests, so I could start refactoring it in small steps and start over again whether I have made a mistake.

I started by defining a functional interface called ParameterConverter:

and I created an immutable map which maps each Class object to its associated ParameterConverter instance (making use of method references):

Then I refactored the original conditional method to get the ParameterConverter instance from the convertersByClass map and mapping to an Optional instance in case it didn’t exist.

After those refactorings, SonarLint stopped warning me. Below is the modified version of the original method with some helper methods:

The complete code can be found here.

What did you think about this refactoring? Have you ever had such a situation? Drop your comments here!

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Streams in JDK 8: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Great session in JavaOne 2017 about Streams and lambdas introduced in JDK8.

The session shows many examples of Java code using forEach() with side effects and how to refactor them to a functional approach using streams and the Collectors API.

What are your experiences using Streams and lambdas in JDK 8? Are you correctly using the Collectors API?

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Converting a Map to a List in Java 8, Groovy and Ruby

Some days ago I was developing a task on a Gradle project and I faced with a situation where I had to convert a Map < String, List < String >> to List < Pair >, each pair containing the key and one element from the List.

I decided to compare the solution in three different languages: Java 8 (using lambdas and the Streams API), Groovy and Ruby to see how concise and expressive they would be. Then, I created the Groovy code and it looked like this:

Running the above code, the result is below:

The Ruby version looked like this:

The Ruby program generated the following output:

Below is the Java 8 version, using lambdas, Streams and the Collectors API:

Running the Java 8 version produced the following output:

The Groovy and Ruby version are very expressive and concise. Note the use of the collectMany method on the Groovy version and the use of the flatten method on the Ruby version to flatten the result list into a single list of pairs.
The Java 8 version made use of the collect method of the Stream API, to collect the results in a list of Pair instances, each one holding the key and value of each element from the List< String >.

What do you think about this comparison? Leave your comments here!

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JavaCodeKata – Lambdas

I’ve came across that kata from @brjavaman and @yanaga to teach lambdas, one of the new features of JDK 8.

There are some unit tests to validate the solution. I’ve found it a good opportunity to exercise the use of lambdas so I decided to solve it. Below is my solution to this kata.

The first method should take the String list and sort all the String elements in ascending (ASCII) order:

The other method should take the String list and:

  1. filter the elements that contains one or more digits
  2. transform (map) the remaining Strings into Integers
  3. sort the Integers in ascending order

The last method should take the String list and:

  1. filter the elements that contains one or more digits
  2. transform (map) the remaining Strings into Integers
  3. sort the Integers in descending order

Note that the steps filter the elements that contains one or more digits and transform (map) the remaining Strings into Integers are identical. So I decided to extract the partial Stream into a method with the Extract Method refactoring support on IntelliJ IDEA:

Then I refactored the the solution to use the new extracted method:

I re-run the tests and they all passed. What do you think about this solution? Do you suggest other ones?