Archive for category java

Java 8: Converting Optional Collection to the Streams API

Although Java 9 has already been released, this post is about converting an optional collection to the Streams API introduced in Java 8.

Suppose some person could have zero, one or more cars and it is represented by the Person class below (some code omitted).

Now we create a list of people and we want to get Mark’s cars.

How can we do that using the Streams API, since the getCars() method return an Optional?

One possibility is to filter people’s list by Mark’s name, filter the Optional if it is present or not and map its wrapped value (our cars list):

At this moment we reached the reason of this blog post. And how can we get all people’s cars? The idea here is to use the flatMap() operation unwrapping the Optional to the collection’s stream when it is present or getting an empty stream when it isn’t present:

We can do better and replace the above solution to be more functional using method references:

If you use IntelliJ IDEA as your favorite IDE, it has an inspection that helps replacing Optional.isPresent() with a functional expression:

P.S. In Java 9, the stream() method was added to the Optional API, so we can rewrite the above stream pipeline into the following one:

In case you are interested, this post on the IntelliJ IDEA blog has some good tips when working with Java 8.

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About the Kotlin programming language

Kotlin is a statically typed language which is fully interoperable with Java.

Recently my friend Andre showed me Kotlin‘s nice syntax and I considered giving it a try.

In the meantime, my friend Leonnardo sent me this nice link which helps migrating from Java to Kotlin easily.

Let’s compare some syntax from Java and Kotlin and see the differences. Suppose we have some employees and we want to group them by their departments.

In Java we create an Employee class, build some employees and use the Streams API to group them by their departments:

In Kotlin we create a data class Employee, build some employees and use the collection built-in groupBy method to group them by their departments:

As you can see, Kotlin has some syntactic sugar that makes it less verbose than Java.

If you haven’t considered trying Kotlin yet, I think it is worth giving it a try.

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Importing and debugging Eclipse projects in IntelliJ IDEA

Last week I faced a situation to import some Eclipse projects to IntelliJ IDEA, my default Java IDE. IntelliJ IDEA supports this integration, just go to File > New > Project from Existing Sources… and select a directory where Eclipse .project or .classpath files are located.

The project was imported successfully, it had some test compilation errors and it was all done for that moment. But, after running the project, I noted that I couldn’t debug some classes as well as I got used at Eclipse.

It was because, by default, IntelliJ IDEA uses the javac compiler and Eclipse has its own Java compiler that is part of JDT core. IntelliJ IDEA doesn’t proceed on code compilation when it finds the first error, even for test code or code that isn’t part of the build. The Eclipse compiler is able to proceed on code compilation even if it has compilation errors, so it is possible to run / debug code that doesn’t compile at all.

The solution, in this case, is to switch IntelliJ IDEA to use the Eclipse compiler. Just go to File > Settings > Build, Execution, Deployment > Compiler > Java compiler and change the drop down box "Use compiler:" to Eclipse and that is done.

I did that and now I am able to run / debug the Eclipse project using IntelliJ IDEA very well.

I have found the solution here:

Enable Partial Compile IntelliJ
What is the difference between javac and the Eclipse compiler?

Have you faced a situation like this? Have you done another solution than mine? Drop your comments here! 🙂

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Converting a Map to a List in Java 8, Groovy and Ruby

Some days ago I was developing a task on a Gradle project and I faced with a situation where I had to convert a Map < String, List < String >> to List < Pair >, each pair containing the key and one element from the List.

I decided to compare the solution in three different languages: Java 8 (using lambdas and the Streams API), Groovy and Ruby to see how concise and expressive they would be. Then, I created the Groovy code and it looked like this:

Running the above code, the result is below:

The Ruby version looked like this:

The Ruby program generated the following output:

Below is the Java 8 version, using lambdas, Streams and the Collectors API:

Running the Java 8 version produced the following output:

The Groovy and Ruby version are very expressive and concise. Note the use of the collectMany method on the Groovy version and the use of the flatten method on the Ruby version to flatten the result list into a single list of pairs.
The Java 8 version made use of the collect method of the Stream API, to collect the results in a list of Pair instances, each one holding the key and value of each element from the List< String >.

What do you think about this comparison? Leave your comments here!

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JavaCodeKata – Lambdas

I’ve came across that kata from @brjavaman and @yanaga to teach lambdas, one of the new features of JDK 8.

There are some unit tests to validate the solution. I’ve found it a good opportunity to exercise the use of lambdas so I decided to solve it. Below is my solution to this kata.

The first method should take the String list and sort all the String elements in ascending (ASCII) order:

The other method should take the String list and:

  1. filter the elements that contains one or more digits
  2. transform (map) the remaining Strings into Integers
  3. sort the Integers in ascending order

The last method should take the String list and:

  1. filter the elements that contains one or more digits
  2. transform (map) the remaining Strings into Integers
  3. sort the Integers in descending order

Note that the steps filter the elements that contains one or more digits and transform (map) the remaining Strings into Integers are identical. So I decided to extract the partial Stream into a method with the Extract Method refactoring support on IntelliJ IDEA:

Then I refactored the the solution to use the new extracted method:

I re-run the tests and they all passed. What do you think about this solution? Do you suggest other ones?