Posts Tagged java

Singleton in Java with Enum types

Java 1.5 introduced the concept of Enum types. They are type-safe constants, which implements equals(), hashCode() and cannot be extended. Each constant can have attributes and override an abstract method created on each Enum class.

Although Singletons are not encouraged, the best way to create it is using Enum types. Here is an example:

And then you call it this way:

Using Enums to create Singletons brings the serialization mechanism already bundled in the Enum type. This technique is described on the Effective Java Second Edition book by Joshua Block.

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Java-Quiz: The Iterator Quiz

Danilo sent us an interesting Java-Quiz from the Java Specialists’ Newsletter created by Olivier Croisier. You have to insert your corrective code in place of the //FIXME comment, following these instructions:

  1. Do not modify his existing code, it’s Perfect (of course).
  2. The FIXME tag shows where you’re allowed to insert your corrective code
  3. He must be able to understand your solution when he comes back (so using Reflection is not an option).

Can you find a solution for it?

Later I’ll post my attempt to solve it.

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Eclipse Log4J template

My friend Bruno sent me an interesting tip on how to create a Log4J template at Eclipse. Just follow these steps:

  1. Go to Window > Preferences > Java > Editor > Templates
  2. Click New
  3. Write the string logger at the field Name (this name will be used to call the template)
  4. At the field Pattern, write the following:

    private static final Logger LOGGER = Logger.getLogger(${enclosing_type}.class);

  5. Click OK

The variable ${enclosing_type} refers to the enclosing type name. When you are ready, write down logger on the field class declaration to have a logger added to the class.

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Using Hamcrest and JUnit

Lately I started using the core Hamcrest matchers bundled with the JUnit framework to create more readable unit tests.

Hamcrest matchers were created to improve the readability of unit testing code. It’s a framework which facilitates the creation of matcher objects to match rules specified in unit tests. Some examples will let it to be clearer:

The first example checks if one Person object is equal to another using the Object equals method, which was overridden in the Person class. The is syntax defines a matcher which is a shorthand to is(equalTo(value)). The second one uses the is(equalTo(value)) matcher to check the size of an integer list of fixed size numbers. The assertThat method is used in conjunction with the is(equalTo(value)) matcher, which makes the test sentence very human readable.

An interesting thing is the possibility to create a custom matcher, like this one which tests if a given list only has even numbers:

And below are two tests which uses the AreEvenNumbers custom matcher:

These two tests use the static factory method evenNumbers to instantiate the matcher on the test code. Not the use of the not matcher on the shouldNotHaveOddNumbers test to assert that no odd numbers are present on the given list. All tests use the static import feature, which turns the test not clean and not cluttered with the class qualification.

I haven’t experienced the other common matchers on unit testing code, like the Beans, Collections and Number ones. I think they turn the tests more readable, clean and easy to change. And you? Have you ever used Hamcrest matcher? If you have other examples of using it, post them here!

Updated: Static imports were added to the testing code.

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JDK7 Tackles Java Verbosity

Interesting article showing some changes on the Java platform to address its verbosity, but keeping code readability safe.
I liked the new Collection’s literals syntax to create lists, sets and maps:

List powersOf2 = {1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024};
Map ages = {"John" : 35, "Mary" : 28, "Steve" : 42};

Although it can be possible to use the DoubleBraceInitialization idiom to initialize collections in a more elegant way, this syntax is very terse and concise.

BTW, as I said before, Scala already has a syntactic sugar to create a literal Map:

val ages = Map("John" -> 35, "Mary" -> 28, "Steve" -> 42)

Maybe this change was taken into account considering the Scala collection literals implementation?

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A Brief History of Java and JDBC

From Javalobby, an interesting and short video showing the evolution of the Java platform since 1991.

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Using Scala to update LiveJournal tags – Part I

Some days ago I started to use the Scala programming language to update my Livejournal tags using its XML-RPC protocol reference. First I had to check if some tags of mine were entered wrong, so I’ve done this Scala program to list all of them:

Just fill your user and password to have all of your LiveJournal tags printed on the standard output. The experience was so amazing, since you can use all the Java libraries (Scala is fully interoperable with Java and runs on top of the JVM). I used a TreeSet because I wanted print my tags sorted according its alphabetical order. I’m continuously studying Scala and its API, so the code above doesn’t use any advanced Scala constructs. If you have any suggestion about the code or how to use better the Scala constructs, post your comments here. It will be all appreciated.

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Twitter on Scala Interview

There is a nice interview with the Twitter development team on Artima about using Scala in production on Twitter code. The team talks about some issues and facilities regarding the chose of Scala to develop Twitter’s queueing system and how Scala affected the team’s programming style.

My personal highlights:

And Ruby, like many scripting languages, has trouble being an environment for long lived processes. But the JVM is very good at that, because it’s been optimized for that over the last ten years..

So Scala provides a basis for writing long-lived servers…Another thing we really like about Scala is static typing that’s not painful. Sometimes it would be really nice in Ruby to say things like, here’s an optional type annotation

And because Ruby’s garbage collector is not quite as good as Java’s, each process uses up a lot of memory. We can’t really run very many Ruby daemon processes on a single machine without consuming large amounts of memory

In some cases we just decided to burrow down and use the Java collections from Scala, which is a nice advantage of Scala, that we have that option..

As I’ve learned more Scala I’ve started thinking more functionally than I did before. When I first started I would use the for expression, which is very much like Python’s. Now more often I find myself invoking map or foreach directly on iterators..

The reason you should care about immutability is that if you’re using threads and your objects are immutable, you don’t have to worry about things changing underneath you..

It’s very worth read. Post your comments here when you read it.

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Bean Validation – Emmanuel Bernard on JSR 303

JavaLobby released an interesting interview with Emmanuel Bernard, the spec lead of of JSR-303: Bean Validation..

One of the important goals of the Bean Validation spec is, as Emmanuel Bernard says, is

to provide a default runtime engine that is used to validate the constraints around the domain model, in Java.

The development team decided to use annotations to express the constraints applied at the domain model. They argued that with annotations the constraints are put directly at the properties in the code, expressing the constraints associated with the property.

I highlighted some interesting parts of the interview:

Bean Validation lets you standardize the way you declare the constraints. So an application developer will just know one way to declare constraints, and just forget about all the different models. There’s no duplication around the validation on the layers.

If you think about a constraint, a constraint is really some kind of an extension of the type system.

Bean Validation lets you validate an object graph using the @Valid annotation. Basically saying, ‘Well, when you validate this object, make sure the associated object is validated as well.’ By the way, even if Bean Validation is primarily annotation focused, there is the equivalent in XML.

Any framework that is having a need to use validation, to apply validation, can either use the runtime engine of Bean Validation or go extract the metadata and play with that. So the user declares it once, in one place, and every framework in the Java space can actually go and either apply the validation routine …

You can listen the podcast of the interview also. It’s very noteworthy to read or listen the interview and see what’s next on validation in Java. Before the Bean Validation API become public to all of us, which framework do you use to validate constraints on the Java platform?

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Joshua Block on How to Design a Good API & Why it Matters

In this talk (recorded at Javapolis), Joshua Block presents guidelines about how to design good APIs. I highlighted what i think are the most important parts of the talk:

  • Functionality should be easy to explain: If it’s hard to name, that’s generally a bad sign
  • Good names drive development
  • Be amenable to splitting and merging modules (If names are nasty, take a step back and make things easy to describe)
  • When in doubt, leave it out
  • You can always add, but tou cannot take it out
  • Implementation Should Not Impact API
  • Always omit implementation details
  • Inhibit freedom to change implementation
  • Don’t let implementation details “leak” into API (For example: Serializable, hash functions)
  • Minimize Accessibility of Everything (This maximizes information hiding)
  • Public classes should’nt have public fields
  • API should be easy to learn, read and use: It should be consistent, it’s a little language
  • Documentation matters (Example: Method contract between it and it’s clients)
  • Think of preconditions, postconditions, side-effects
  • Don’t Transliterate API’s
    • What’s the problem it solves?
    • What shoud abstractions did it use?
  • Don’t Make the Client Do Anything The Module Could do
  • Throw Exceptions to Indicate Exceptional Conditions

When you see the talk, post your comments here.

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